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Posts Tagged ‘ICE’

Bodies on the Line: Fighting Inhumane Treatment with Hunger in Immigrant Detention – Megan Carney

May 4, 2014 Leave a comment

Megan Carney
Arizona State University & University of Washington, Seattle

Heeeeyyyy Obama! Don’t deport my mama!” I marched alongside dozens of protestors as they shouted these words from outside the Northwest Detention Center (NDC) in Tacoma, Washington, on March 11, 2014. Some 1,200 detainees at NDC had initiated a hunger strike four days earlier, issuing a handwritten list of demands to GEO Corp, the private prison company responsible for overseeing site operations. At the top of their list: better food.

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In publicizing the protest, El Comite Pro-Reforma Migratoria Y Justicia Social[1] said hunger strikers were “putting their bodies on the line” for both better food (better, that is, than the bare potato served cold almost every day) and better treatment, better pay, lower commissary, and fairness. The number of huelgistas de hambre (hunger strikers) declined to 750 on day 2, 330 on day 3, and continued to spiral downward until only a handful of strikers remained at the time of the protest. GEO Corp had previously warned strikers that if they continued to refuse food for more than 72 consecutive hours, they would be put on medical watch and possibly force-fed. Immigration attorney Sandra Restrepo, speaking through a megaphone to an audience of protestors, shared her suspicion that detainees had likely withdrawn from the strike as a result of intimidation by guards. Read more…

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What do Haitian Earthquake Survivors and the Super Bowl Have in Common? – Heide Castañeda

January 30, 2010 1 comment

Heide Castañeda
University of South Florida

What do Haitian earthquake survivors and the Super Bowl have in common? They both need the city of Miami.

This week Florida Governor Charlie Crist, in a letter to Kathleen Sebelius, head of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, claimed that the state could not take on any more Haitian medical evacuees without straining services. The governor has asked for an end to emergency airlifts, following two flights that delivered additional earthquake victims to Tampa hospitals this week. Currently, about 500 Haitian survivors are being treated in the state’s hospitals, primarily in the Miami area. The “strain on services” comes as the city prepares for “upcoming events such as might result from the large crowds at the Pro Bowl and Super Bowl,” according to a spokesman for the US Army Southern Command.

Read more…

News Round-Up (1/10/10) – The Dangers of Detention: Illness and Death in U.S. Custody

January 10, 2010 3 comments

Sarah S. Willen
SMU

Just as we were dotting ‘i’s and crossing ‘t’s for this latest news round-up, Nina Bernstein’s front-page article in today’s New York Times, “Officials Hid Truth About Immigrant Deaths in Jail,” hammered home the risks and dangers of being ill or injured in a United States immigration prison.  The piece foregrounds the 2007 deaths – in ICE custody – of Nery Romero, originally from El Salvador, and Boubacar Bah, originally from Guinea.

Bernstein’s reporting was facilitated by the recent release of thousands of pages of confidential documents – among them memos, draft reports, “talking points,” and Blackberry messages – to the NYT and the ACLU under the Freedom of Information Act. Read more…