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Posts Tagged ‘health care reform’

Defects in the Safety Net: When the Emergency Option is the Only Option – Sural Shah

February 27, 2014 1 comment

Sural Shah
Cambridge Health Alliance & Harvard School of Public Health

Ana, age 29, came to the clinic for a sore throat, her two energetic children in tow. While her kids darted around the clinic space, which was donated by a local academic medical center, I introduced myself as a volunteer physician and began asking about her medical history. As Ana moved from her chair to the exam table, she told me she had traveled from Mexico to the United States as a teenager and now was living here illegally, a familiar story among patients in the largely Latino and impoverished Philadelphia community our non-profit clinic[1] serves. Moving my stethoscope around her chest, I was surprised to hear a harsh murmur suggesting problems with the blood flow through her heart.  Read more…

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Two Reforms, One Day, One Broad Message: March 21st, 2010 and the Struggles for Immigration and Health Care Reform – Ruth Gomberg-Muñoz

March 31, 2010 2 comments

Ruth Gomberg-Muñoz
University of Illinois-Chicago

On March 21st, 2010, I was one of more than two hundred thousand people who traveled to Washington D.C. to demand comprehensive immigration reform. According to one news report, this was the largest turnout for a political rally since the election of Barack Obama. Afterward, I heard one immigrant rights activist lament that the passage of the health care bill later the same day overshadowed media coverage of the immigrant rights march. There is certainly truth in his complaint. But there is also another, perhaps more productive, way to understand the relationship of simultaneous struggles for health care and immigration reform.

As I marched along D.C. streets that sunny afternoon in the company of fellow immigrant rights supporters, I passed many activists who––judging by their shirts and signs––were in Washington to advocate for health care reform. Read more…

News Round-Up (2/27/10)

February 27, 2010 Leave a comment

Nolan Kline
University of South Florida

Current talk about excluding immigrants from health care reform raises crucial questions about the relationship between health care access and immigration status. Who deserves access to medical care, and why are immigrants sometimes viewed as less deserving of care?

Mounting evidence suggests that the current health care reform proposals – whatever their fate – will do little to address immigrants’ health care  barriers, as Feet in 2 Worlds notes, citing a press release from New Yorkers for Accessible Health Coverage and the New York Immigration Coalition. In some respects, current proposals would create additional hindrances for certain immigrant groups.  Read more…

News Round-Up (12/23/09) – Unspeakable Exclusion: Immigration and the Politics of U.S. Health Care Reform

December 23, 2009 Leave a comment

Sarah S. Willen (SMU) & Nolan Kline (University of South Florida)

Although politicians on both the right and the left have expressed their reservations, the legislative push to pass health care reform before Christmas eve appears to be moving forward at full steam – importantly, without any substantive discussion of whether excluding unauthorized migrants and immigrants makes sense.

However the chips fall, we are left with one key take-home lesson from this lengthy, dramatic legislative saga: Americans of all stripes are, and remain, woefully ignorant about the scale and scope of unauthorized migrants’ and immigrants’ health needs; about the interconnectedness among im/migrants’ health concerns and those of citizens and authorized residents; and about the reasons – practical, financial, legal, and ethical – why helping im/migrants obtain health care might be in the collective best interest.

During the most recent debate, a few rare voices have bucked this trend. In a New York Times op-ed titled “Coverage Without Borders”, for instance, Cardinal Roger Mahony, Archbishop of Los Angeles, argues that, Read more…