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4/30: “Europe’s migrant crisis: What can be done?” (livestreamed event)

April 27, 2015 Leave a comment

On Thursday, April 30, from 12:30-2:00pm EST, the Overseas Development Institute in London will hold a public event on “Europe’s migrant crisis: What can be done?” The event will also be livestreamed and tweeted using the hashtag #MigrantCrisis. To register, and for further details, see below or visit ODI’s website.

“OVERVIEW

This year has already seen more than 1,750 migrants die in the Mediterranean as thousands attempt to flee Africa and the Middle East for Europe – largely from Syria, Eritrea and Somalia where conflict is rife.

With sophisticated criminal networks helping more and more people into boats, a lack of funding or support for search and rescue operations and a rising hostility towards migrants across Europe, what can be done to stop the soaring death rate in its tracks? For those tens of thousands who do make it ashore every week, what should happen next?

Can and should development policies play a greater role in supporting migration?  Join ODI for this timely debate with migration experts and representatives with first-hand experience of making the journey.

EVENT SCHEDULE

Introductory remarks:

Kevin Watkins, Executive Director, ODI

Chair: Paul Kenyon, BAFTA-winning Panorama journalist

Speakers:

Gonzalo Fanjul, Head of Research, porCausa Foundation (Madrid)

Marta Foresti, Director of Governance, security and livelihoods, Politics and Governance, ODI

Laurence Hart, Head of Migrant Assistance Division, International Organization for Migration (IOM)

Alexander Betts, Associate Professor of Refugee and Forced Migration Studies, University of Oxford

Gonzalo Vargas Llosa, Representative to the UK, UN Refugee Agency (UNHCR)

 http://www.odi.org/events/4199-europes-migrant-crisis-can-be-done

Categories: Upcoming event

Foreign Girl Forever – Einat Fishbain

June 25, 2014 1 comment

Einat Fishbain

Lily Oudraogo was born in Tel Aviv, and that’s where she lived and died. Twenty-five difficult and insulting years on the margins of society, and beyond, reached an end on June 6, likely from complications of preeclampsia (a pregnancy-related condition involving high blood pressure, among other factors). Her younger son, Ben-El William, born less than a week earlier, is still in the neonatal department at Tel Aviv’s Ichilov Hospital. Her five-year-old son Michael is with friends from the local Ghanaian community who are trying to help. Francis, Lily’s partner for the past three years, wanders the halls of the hospital, fluctuating between courteous smiles at those offering consolation to spells of crying, anger, and helplessness. It is hard to imagine a sadder and more senseless end to the life of a woman who spent her entire life trying to survive in the land of her birth.

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Lily was born in 1989, the second daughter of unauthorized migrant workers from Ghana who had arrived in Israel a few years earlier, leaving their older daughter in Ghana. Read more…

News Round Up In-Brief

June 19, 2014 Leave a comment

U.S. News

Read more…

Bodies on the Line: Fighting Inhumane Treatment with Hunger in Immigrant Detention – Megan Carney

May 4, 2014 Leave a comment

Megan Carney
Arizona State University & University of Washington, Seattle

Heeeeyyyy Obama! Don’t deport my mama!” I marched alongside dozens of protestors as they shouted these words from outside the Northwest Detention Center (NDC) in Tacoma, Washington, on March 11, 2014. Some 1,200 detainees at NDC had initiated a hunger strike four days earlier, issuing a handwritten list of demands to GEO Corp, the private prison company responsible for overseeing site operations. At the top of their list: better food.

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In publicizing the protest, El Comite Pro-Reforma Migratoria Y Justicia Social[1] said hunger strikers were “putting their bodies on the line” for both better food (better, that is, than the bare potato served cold almost every day) and better treatment, better pay, lower commissary, and fairness. The number of huelgistas de hambre (hunger strikers) declined to 750 on day 2, 330 on day 3, and continued to spiral downward until only a handful of strikers remained at the time of the protest. GEO Corp had previously warned strikers that if they continued to refuse food for more than 72 consecutive hours, they would be put on medical watch and possibly force-fed. Immigration attorney Sandra Restrepo, speaking through a megaphone to an audience of protestors, shared her suspicion that detainees had likely withdrawn from the strike as a result of intimidation by guards. Read more…

Defects in the Safety Net: When the Emergency Option is the Only Option – Sural Shah

February 27, 2014 Leave a comment

Sural Shah
Cambridge Health Alliance & Harvard School of Public Health

Ana, age 29, came to the clinic for a sore throat, her two energetic children in tow. While her kids darted around the clinic space, which was donated by a local academic medical center, I introduced myself as a volunteer physician and began asking about her medical history. As Ana moved from her chair to the exam table, she told me she had traveled from Mexico to the United States as a teenager and now was living here illegally, a familiar story among patients in the largely Latino and impoverished Philadelphia community our non-profit clinic[1] serves. Moving my stethoscope around her chest, I was surprised to hear a harsh murmur suggesting problems with the blood flow through her heart.  Read more…

Prison Break: African Asylum Seekers Claim Their Place on the Israeli Political Map – Haggai Matar

December 26, 2013 Leave a comment

Haggai Matar

Saturday night was something no one in Israel had ever seen before. It was supposed to be a small demonstration – a quiet march of several hundred Israeli activists and African asylum seekers, coming on the heels of two Marches for Freedom earlier in the week, to protest a new amendment to Israel’s Anti-Infiltration Act. Legislated after the High Court scrapped an earlier amendment, the new version authorizes the automatic detention of asylum seekers for up to one year in an ostensibly “open” detention facility, including asylum seekers already living freely in the country. Since the earlier marches were intercepted and suppressed by immigration authorities, initially it didn’t seem that Saturday’s march would get much (if any) media attention. But from the second it began, it was clear to all present that this time was different.

Asylum seekers marching under a crowd of classical music lovers at Tel Aviv’s “Culture Palace.” (Oren Ziv / Activestills)

More than 2,000 asylum seekers, all in danger of immediate and permanent imprisonment following the passage of the new amendment, marched in the streets of south and central Tel Aviv. The asylum seekers, who had likely seen pictures or heard stories of their friends’ desert marches, were in high gear and bursting with energy. They started running through the streets, chanting just two slogans over and over again: “No more prison!” and “we want freedom!” Read more…

Job Announcement: Tenure-track position in the Anthropology of Global Health and Human Rights at the University of Connecticut

December 3, 2013 Leave a comment

AccessDenied readers may be interested in the following position announcement:

The University of Connecticut has initiated a search for a tenure-track assistant professor of anthropology specializing in the anthropology of global health and human rights. The position will be a joint appointment between UConn’s Department of Anthropology and Human Rights Institute. The position announcement, with full details, is accessible online at https://academicjobsonline.org/ajo/jobs/3626. Candidates are urged to apply by December 6, 2013. 

Categories: Job posting
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