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Archive for July, 2010

Potential Health Outcomes of Being Undocumented and Homeless – Maggie Sullivan

July 19, 2010 Leave a comment

Maggie Sullivan

Homeless persons who are also unauthorized immigrants face a reality of extreme marginalization which puts them at significant physical and mental health risk. As a family nurse practitioner working in shelter-based clinics, I care for many of these patients regularly. And though resiliency is certainly not uncommon, the burden of disease for those who are both homeless and unauthorized is high.

Not having a home and being undocumented confers considerable health risks. It is known that homelessness, in and of itself, confers significant risk of illness and premature death[i]. The majority of homeless individuals in the United States are U.S. citizens, and many of our foreign-born homeless patients are authorized immigrants. The minority who are both homeless and unauthorized immigrants face unique challenges and risks to their health. It is an aspect of health disparity not often addressed. Read more…

Expanding Vulnerability: Health Care, Well-Being, and Arizona’s Immigration Policies – Julie Armin & Robin Reineke

July 11, 2010 1 comment

Julie Armin & Robin Reineke
University of Arizona

Arizona has seen a systematic attack on immigrants over the past year.  Several anti-immigrant measures have passed through the legislature in recent months, and more are in the planning stages. Through the everyday enforcement of these policies, the borders of the United States are re-inscribed on bodies and within communities, creating “legal” and “illegal” categories of people who have differential access to state resources and services. Nicholas De Genova argues that ‘illegality’ “is an erasure of legal personhood” that is designed not to physically exclude individuals, but “to socially include them under imposed conditions of enforced and protracted vulnerability.”[1] These constructed categories can expand, compromising the well-being of those who seem to fall outside their initial reach, as friends, co-workers, teachers, doctors, and community members are implicated. Read more…

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